Review: Park Tool Super Patch Kit

By | May 28, 2014

Update…  I was enamored with the Park Tool Super Patch Kit, but the honeymoon is over.  It has been nothing but frustration ever since.  Read more at:

http://cyclebuttcrack.com/review-park-tool-super-patch-kit-redux/

It wasn’t long ago that a new tube was $3-$4.  As with most things, prices have gone up.  It is not uncommon to spend $6 for a new tube.  If you have deep dish rims, a tube can be well over $10.  It also seems wasteful to throw away a perfectly good tube with a single tiny pin hole.  I have been repairing tubes for years.  It was a task that I always hated.  I hate dealing with the rubber cement, peeling the patch off the foil backing and hoping it sticks.  The rubber cement may also have evaporated since it was used last rendering your unused patches useless.  I always carry a spare tube, but if disaster strikes twice, I would rather take a bus home than attempt an emergency tube repair with rubber cement and standard patches.

I was at my local bike shop a few months ago and picked up Park Tool’s Super Patch Kit.  Well let me destroy any suspense.  I love them!  I don’t how I ever got by without them.  I now have a stack of tubes that are patched and ready to go and it takes a fraction of the time.  I trust these the Park Tool Super Patches enough to bring them along with me on my rides (in addition to a spare tube).  The process of using the Park Tool Super Patch is as follows:

Park Tool Super Patch Kit with sandpaper and (6) peel and stick patches is tiny!

Park Tool Super Patch Kit with sandpaper and (6) peel and stick patches is tiny!

I am going to assume that you have removed the tube from the tire and wheel.  After that, I take my pump to inflate the tube.  The more air you put in the tube, the easier it is to find the hole.

Hole tube marked with silver sharpie for reference.

Hole tube marked with silver sharpie for reference.

In order to ensure proper adhesion, the surface of the tube has to be roughed up.  Also most tubes have seams that interfere with the patch’s ability to adhere to the tube, especially when the puncture is close to the seam.  I like to sand off at least some of the seam.

Sanded tube with sandpaper from Super Patch Kit

Sanded tube with sandpaper from Super Patch Kit

Now that your tube is prepped and ready to go, it is time to remove the patch from its paper backing.  BE WARNED, THESE THINGS STICK TO ANYTHING!  TAKE PRECAUTIONS TO TOUCH AS LITTLE OF THE PATCH AS POSSIBLE! I had to throw my first patch away after it stuck to my finger, and hand and eventually itself.

Be careful with these guys.  Surprisingly enough...  They are sticky!

Be careful with these guys. Surprisingly enough… They are sticky!

Carefully place the center of the patch over the center of the puncture.  Note: I like to have a little bit of air in the tube to make this easier.  Too much air pressure will create an air bubble under the patch and likely a leak.  Also if the tube is too large when the patch is applied, it will get all ‘wrinkely’ when the tube is deflated.  This does not seem to affect adhesion, but it is less than ideal.

Partially applied patch

Partially applied patch

Press the patch in place starting from the center and working outward to eliminate any bubbles.  Use your fingernails to press the patch into any creases.  Since the patch is clear, the bubbles are readily apparent.

Work out any air bubbles from the center out with your fingernails.

Work out any air bubbles from the center out with your fingernails.

That is it!  You are done!

 

Update…  I was enamored with the Park Tool Super Patch Kit, but the honeymoon is over.  It has been nothing but frustration ever since.  Read more at:

http://cyclebuttcrack.com/review-park-tool-super-patch-kit-redux/

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